Straddie highlights the magic of partial solar eclipse: Gallery

Viewed from Adder Rock, on North Stradbroke Island, the glimmer of the setting sun on the water added another dimension. Photo by Julie Sisco - Julie Sisco Photography

Viewed from Adder Rock, on North Stradbroke Island, the glimmer of the setting sun on the water added another dimension. Photo by Julie Sisco - Julie Sisco Photography

In South East Queensland, North Stradbroke Island photographer Julie Sisco captured Tuesday night’s partial solar eclipse  with spectacular pictures from the ocean looking inland.

It was a rare celestial event as a crescent sun sunk below the horizon at sunset.

Viewed from Adder Rock, on North Stradbroke Island, the glimmer of the setting sun on the water added another dimension.

The event, known as a non-central annular eclipse, ends the first eclipse season of 2014.

According to NASA, out of the 3956 annular eclipses that have and will occur during the 5000-year period from 2000BCE to 3000AD, only 68 of them are non-central.

An annular eclipse occurs when the moon does not cover the entire disk of the sun, resulting in a bright 'annulus' (or 'ring-of-fire') being visible, and a non-central eclipse occurs when the centre of the moon's shadow, known as the antumbra, just misses Earth and its shadow edge grazes only a small area of the planet; in this instance, 500 kilometres of a remote area on the Antarctic continent.

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